Tour overview

Waterfalls wildlife in Sri Lanka



Sri Lanka is home to approximately ninety-one species of mammals. Of these ninety-one, sixteen are endemic and can only be found in Sri Lanka while fourteen are threatened including the large Sloth Bear, the Sri Lankan Leopard and the Sri Lankan Elephant. Due to the geographical differences (climate, vegetation and altitude) found in Sri Lanka, mammals are widely distributed throughout the country.

The Sloth Bear and Leopards are found in the majority of National Parks in Sri Lanka, however, Sloth Bears are most commonly spotted between June and July in either Yala or Wasgamuwa National Parks. Research suggests that Yala National Park hosts the highest density of leopards in the world.

The elephant population has dropped steadily in the past hundred years and is estimated to be at approximately 4,500-5,000. The population has fallen due to extreme loss of habitat. Udawalawe National Park is considered by many to be one of the best natural habitats to view elephants year round. Minneriya National Park is famous for “The Gathering” that happens between July and October when the park witnesses over three hundred elephants gathering by the Minneriya water tank due to the immense dry season experienced there. It is believed that the amount of elephants gathering in Minneriya is the highest in the world.

There are also three monkey species found in Sri Lanka as well as a variety of bats, squirrels and a further twenty-six marine species located in the waters around the country. Blue whales and spinner and Risso’s dolphins can be found of the coasts of Mirissa and Kalpitiya. Black tip reef sharks are also spotted in Sri Lankan waters. The beaches located on the west and south coasts offer year round accommodation for endangered marine turtles who come ashore to nest. Approximately 227 bird species live in Sri Lanka, however, some people place the number at over 400.

Sri Lanka is home to 171 reptile species, the majority of which are snakes. The largest reptiles in Sri Lanka are two species of crocodile, the Mugger Crocodile and the Saltwater Crocodile. With 106 amphibian species, many claim that Sri Lanka has the highest density of amphibian species in the world.

With upwards of 26.5% of the total land area of the country being listed as protected, Sri Lanka has a higher percentage of protected areas than any other country in Asia as well as much of the world. Sri Lanka has 501 listed areas covering around 1,767,000 ha including 32 forests. Within the 501 protected areas are 92 Key Biodiversity Areas which are considered irreplaceable because they each house endemic species with some providing habitats to more than 100 globally threatened species. There are also four Biosphere Reserves which have been declared under UNESCO’s Man and Biosphere Reserve Programme.

The Sloth Bear and Leopards are found in the majority of National Parks in Sri Lanka, however, Sloth Bears are most commonly spotted between June and July in either Yala or Wasgamuwa National Parks. Research suggests that Yala National Park hosts the highest density of leopards in the world.The elephant population has dropped steadily in the past hundred years and is estimated to be at approximately 4,500-5,000. The population has fallen due to extreme loss of habitat. Udawalawe National Park is considered by many to be one of the best natural habitats to view elephants year round. Minneriya National Park is famous for “The Gathering” that happens between July and October when the park witnesses over three hundred elephants gathering by the Minneriya water tank due to the immense dry season experienced there. It is believed that the amount of elephants gathering in Minneriya is the highest in the world.

There are also three monkey species found in Sri Lanka as well as a variety of bats, squirrels and a further twenty-six marine species located in the waters around the country. Blue whales and spinner and Risso’s dolphins can be found of the coasts of Mirissa and Kalpitiya. Black tip reef sharks are also spotted in Sri Lankan waters. The beaches located on the west and south coasts offer year round accommodation for endangered marine turtles who come ashore to nest. Approximately 227 bird species live in Sri Lanka, however, some people place the number at over 400.

Sri Lanka is home to 171 reptile species, the majority of which are snakes. The largest reptiles in Sri Lanka are two species of crocodile, the Mugger Crocodile and the Saltwater Crocodile. With 106 amphibian species, many claim that Sri Lanka has the highest density of amphibian species in the world.

With upwards of 26.5% of the total land area of the country being listed as protected, Sri Lanka has a higher percentage of protected areas than any other country in Asia as well as much of the world. Sri Lanka has 501 listed areas covering around 1,767,000 ha including 32 forests. Within the 501 protected areas are 92 Key Biodiversity Areas which are considered irreplaceable because they each house endemic species with some providing habitats to more than 100 globally threatened species. There are also four Biosphere Reserves which have been declared under UNESCO’s Man and Biosphere Reserve Programme.
Waterfalls wildlife in Sri Lanka

The Sloth Bear and Leopards are found in the majority of National Parks in Sri Lanka, however, Sloth Bears are most commonly spotted between June and July in either Yala or Wasgamuwa National Parks. Research suggests that Yala National Park hosts the highest density of leopards in the world.

The elephant population has dropped steadily in the past hundred years and is estimated to be at approximately 4,500-5,000. The population has fallen due to extreme loss of habitat. Udawalawe National Park is considered by many to be one of the best natural habitats to view elephants year round. Minneriya National Park is famous for “The Gathering” that happens between July and October when the park witnesses over three hundred elephants gathering by the Minneriya water tank due to the immense dry season experienced there. It is believed that the amount of elephants gathering in Minneriya is the highest in the world.

There are also three monkey species found in Sri Lanka as well as a variety of bats, squirrels and a further twenty-six marine species located in the waters around the country. Blue whales and spinner and Risso’s dolphins can be found of the coasts of Mirissa and Kalpitiya. Black tip reef sharks are also spotted in Sri Lankan waters. The beaches located on the west and south coasts offer year round accommodation for endangered marine turtles who come ashore to nest. Approximately 227 bird species live in Sri Lanka, however, some people place the number at over 400.

Sri Lanka is home to 171 reptile species, the majority of which are snakes. The largest reptiles in Sri Lanka are two species of crocodile, the Mugger Crocodile and the Saltwater Crocodile. With 106 amphibian species, many claim that Sri Lanka has the highest density of amphibian species in the world.

With upwards of 26.5% of the total land area of the country being listed as protected, Sri Lanka has a higher percentage of protected areas than any other country in Asia as well as much of the world. Sri Lanka has 501 listed areas covering around 1,767,000 ha including 32 forests. Within the 501 protected areas are 92 Key Biodiversity Areas which are considered irreplaceable because they each house endemic species with some providing habitats to more than 100 globally threatened species. There are also four Biosphere Reserves which have been declared under UNESCO’s Man and Biosphere Reserve Programme.

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Waterfalls in Sri Lanka

Waterfalls in Sri Lanka

Waterfalls in Sri Lanka

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Waterfalls in Sri Lanka

As an Island, Sri Lanka has the highest percentage number of waterfalls from all countries in the world. Geographically Sri Lankan land is divided into 3 parts: Coastal Line, Mid wet zone and Hill Country.
Hill country is situated in the middle of this island and it powers the most rivers going all across the country, these huge water carriers sometimes cross the mid-wet zone boundary through very straight slopes and rocks, where they make the world famous eye-catching waterfalls.
The main purpose of this trip is to visit the most beautiful, well known and hidden waterfalls in the hills, sometimes I will take you to the top of waterfalls to give you a different angle of what you see things :)) , we will camp on top of the waterfalls according to your request and we will have bath at the natural pools made by these lovely water streams.
Especially nature lovers may join this programme as it is not only a tour but a positive message of protecting nature.

Bird watching

Sinharaja world heritage site spreads over wide elevation range (300m – 1100m). It is rich in bird life with an impressive 147 species recorded to date. It is also the only location where 21 out of 26 bird species endemic to Sri Lanka may be viewed. The Rainforest Ecolodge is ideally located at the 1025m elevation having both lowland and the highland species present in Sinharaja in its vicinity. A few endemic and other species thought to be confined to the hill zone i.e. the Sri Lanka White-eye (Zosterops ceylonensis), the Scaly Thrush (Zoothera dauma), the Wood Pigeon (Columba torrigtoni), the Dusky Blue Flycatcher (Muscicapa Sordid) and the Yellow-eared Bulbul (Pycnonotus penicillatus), have also been sighted at this area.

Blue Whale watching

Blue whales are the biggest animals that have ever lived on our planet. And if ever you needed an extra reason to go to Sri Lanka, then this is one. Not as famous as, say, Antarctica or the Azores for the big beautiful blues, Sri Lanka is rightfully claiming its own cetacean crown. And what you can’t do in other parts of the whale watching world is see our oceans’ greatest creatures one day and then elephants or leopard the next.
You also don’t need to take on an expedition across great oceans, but simply enjoy glorious experiences along the south coast of the Indian Ocean’s famously beautiful ‘Teardrop Island’. And watching blue whales off Sri Lanka’s coast of Mirissa or Galle certainly will reduce you to tears.